Time’s Unrighteous Unreliability …

Have you ever noticed that the sun is never in the same position at the same time on two different days? I have, all my childhood I wondered, why time never matched the sun. Especially since we call it Solar time. I finally had a chance to see this investigation of time. I’ll not butcher the study by trying to recreate it here on my blog, but I’ll link the youtube video below.

So to understand why I feel so egregiously against time, you have to understand how I view it. First, I fully believe that time is relative to an individual’s perception of time. I have far too often felt like an hour passed when it had been mere minutes, or what felt like minutes was in actuality several hours. Second, I am troubled and often terrified (yes, terrified to the point of extreme inaction or great frustration) with being late.

Anyone who knows me knows that I say you need to be fifteen minutes early or you are late, most people also know that I ascribe to the idea that I must be on time if I am fifteen minutes early. In which case, I need to be thirty minutes early, in order to be early. Let me give an example:

Requested On-Time Arrival Time: 8:00 a.m.
Be Early Adjustment: 15 minutes = 7:45 a.m.
New On-Time Arrival Time: 7:45 a.m.
Enact DJ brain Be Early Adjustment = 7:30 a.m.
New Early Arrival Time = 7:30 a.m.

Now, if this were all it was, I suppose I could cope and others around me could as well. However, my anxious nature alters this further. Now, imagine that no matter where you go, it takes twice as long to get there as you think it does. Imagine you have a 20-minute drive, you leave and the drive takes you 40 minutes. You are now 20 minutes late to your destination. Now imagine that it really only took you 20 minutes, but you live with the knowledge that everything takes twice as long to you. It would look something like this, using the 8:00 a.m. time above:

To arrive early (7:30 a.m. for DJ), you need to leave at 6:30 a.m. (a 1 Hour Trip)
Enact DJ Brain Time Dilation: 1 hour trip = 2 hour trip
New Arrival Time based on Time Dilation = 8:30 a.m.

That means even though it should only take an hour to arrive, and leaving at 6:30, I should still reach my destination at the projected 7:30 time. My brain still tells me, I will be late by 30 minutes. So I go through the entire equation again, including the time dilation. It looks something like this:

Requested On-Time Arrival Time: 8:00 a.m.
Be Early Adjustment: 15 minutes = 7:45 a.m.
New On-Time Arrival Time: 7:45 a.m.
Enact DJ brain Be Early Adjustment = 7:30 a.m.
New Early Arrival Time = 7:30 a.m.
Enact DJ brain Time Dilation Adjustment = 8:30 a.m. (arrival)
Time to Leave Adjustment: 1 hour earlier = 5:30 a.m.

If I leave at 5:30 a.m., my brain tells me, I will arrive at 7:30 a.m. and be just a bit early. Enough time to sit down and read a chapter before the ON TIME of 7:45 a.m. In reality, I show up at 6:00 a.m. and sit around for an hour and forty-five minutes before anyone else starts to arrive. That’s not the end for me, though, because if I FEEL that I am going to be late, I experience a minor panic attack. I fear judgment and chastisement for being late. This creates a sort of maelstrom inside of me that spirals into frustration and anger, which generally spills out to those around me, especially if I feel they are not on the same schedule as me.

So what does this all have to do with how we measure time? It means I am obsessive about time and so much so that I tend to pay far too much attention to things like the sun’s position from one day to another. I have debated that our timelines are wholly inaccurate and should not be used to measure the progress or seasons of the world because we, as human beings, cannot fully grasp the history of time and the general perceptions held in the past. I have hotly debated that our calendar is not correct and subtly shifting everything forward. After watching the below video, I am now wholly convinced that I’ve been right all along. Our Calendar is fallible and pretty much inaccurate.

Why is 60 seconds a minute? Why is 60 minutes an hour? Because we’ve determined that it is so, based on past perceptions of time as we understood them. The Gregorian Calendar (which is what the US uses) states that there are 365.242181 days in a year, based on our 24 hour day, which is actually a 23.9 hour day or Sidereal day. This breakdown of time brings a couple of things into focus for me. We have 7 day weeks because we’ve determined that there are 7 days based on a holy book. But, in truth, we could eliminate weeks and months entirely and still be just as accurate in measuring the days, it would be impractical as 365.242181 days each year would just accumulate. For that matter, our time table of 24 hours is such an off concept.

What if we measured our seconds, minutes, hours differently? What if there were only 10 hours in a day, what would that do to the number of minutes in an hour? The number of seconds in a minute? What if time was based on 1s and 10s instead of 1s and 6s? Maybe, just maybe, it does take twice as long to get somewhere then we think because we’re using the wrong time measurements? If 100 seconds were equal to a minute and 100 minutes equal to an hour, and 10 hours were equal to a day, what would our world and our calendar look like? If we used this base of 10, would there then be 10 days in the week? 10 months in a year? How different would we treat our time?

Welcome to the workings of my mind. As a side note, The Legends of Vandor uses a 10-month calendar with 10 day weeks, but a 20 hour day, anywho, until next times folks.

Your Friendly Neighborhood Author,

DJ Morand

PS. Here is the video.

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